Always a delight to be face to face with Charlie’s love, I mean it is the foundation of the love stories we grew up loving.

Chaplin is not obsessed on seamlessly flowing his content in front of your eyes. And there is nothing wrong with it. Maybe he comes from an era like such. Or the history that he has picked up. Not even others but his own. He came from those silent films. Intertitles are a part of a narration that he can never leave behind. Hence, the constant reminder of a story being told, beautifully parted but never a stream of success. Each act is to be set up, the introduction is then reviered into a plot dilemma solved by the characterization of those characters spiraling out the very first act.

And hence, the writer and director, Charlie Chaplin’s The Gold Rush is split into three acts. The home, the journey and the returning of the home. The film is oddly sketched for the last act is actually humorous. And the first two incredibly intense and moving. While the first one deals with human nature, the second one is a love story that I am gullible for; instead of its known manipulative nature, either way, the affection gets to you.

And you know it was a milestone then, when almost a century later, now, you are in the hot seat for this couple to make amends as soon as possible. I would like to mention the brilliance of Chaplin’s sense of humor in the first act. He is carrying some big guns and dark sensitive material to post it as a character build up. But what’s captivating is how nuanced his humor is. How much aware should you be of your content to draw out impressive chuckles like these. Between two men fighting, where Chaplin is clearly not the guy with the muscles, all he has to do is get out of that situation and not actually get out of the room, that small section of the film is him dodging all the cliches.

Posted by:Arth

you've got a bag of change and here are my thoughts..

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