Rope is a bittersweet experience, confined in its own loop, the tale never evolves nor has the maturity to question the existence and reason out of it.

Hitchcock’s breathtaking party unfortunately isn’t able to keep up with the euphoric energy it starts with. And the energy wears off due to its inessential and frankly dull detour that it takes in order to fill the content up till the real times goes off that ticks on the back off the screen. And even though the ticking bomb goes off quite early to keep the audience tangled in its if-i-must “rope”. But it still isn’t out of its self-created damp surface. The concept itself is a double edge sword. Since both the crime and the investigation of it taken place on screen with live time screenplay the audience finds itself waiting for the writers to achieve their closure that starts to feel like a homework after a while.

The adapted screenplay is from a play which explains the continuity and the flow of the film that is played smartly by the camera work and cinematography in here. The side characters are unfortunately undercooked and are explored only on surface only where the actors are handed over a post it note showing their characteristics which they have managed to hold on to throughout the course. The backstory of the professor and his students who throws the party does help a lot on connecting the dots.

Stewart as the analyser and resolver of the drama is the best support that the two lead actors can aspire for. Grander gets a more unimpressive role to portray hence fails to overpower Dall on his scenes. Whilst Dall is the creator of all, the real convincer, the schemer that tries to bind it all no matter how much it scatters. Rope is a bittersweet experience, confined in its own loop, the tale never evolves nor has the maturity to question the existence and reason out of it.

Posted by:Arth

you've got a bag of change and here are my thoughts..

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